Making a Persuasive Case for Employment

Making a Persuasive Case for Employment
Persuasion can also be applied in the job search process. Essentially, we are presenting ourselves and our qualifications to prospective employers, and persuading them to give us a job. Some companies require applicants to submit supporting documents along with their applications. One such document is a personal statement. This is different from a cover letter, which is normally restricted to a single page. The personal statement may be longer; in it, you present your abilities and persuade your prospective employee that you are qualified for the job. (Note: We will write a cover letter in Module 4).
Refer to the job opening you identified in SLP 1. Using the job description, write a personal statement (about 2 pages long). Your statement should be professionally prepared and lay out your strengths for the job. Please ensure that the contents match the job description for the job you identified in SLP 1.
SLP Assignment Expectations
Your personal statement is a statement that promotes yourself. It should not contain any salutation, unlike a letter, as it will be an attachment. No citations are needed for the statement.
Following the statement, submit an essay discussing the approach you took. Please be sure to use references, which may include the assigned readings, to support your discussion. Formal citations are required, along with a formal bibliography. The summary is to be prepared as an academic essay. Content should be clearly presented with a logical flow.
SLP General Expectations
For the SLP, you are expected to assume the role of a job seeker. You are to identify a job that interests you in Module 1. The SLPs will take you through the job search and application process, presenting you in different scenarios requiring you to demonstrate your ability to communicate effectively and professionally.
REQUIRED REFERENCES
Beason, L., (2001). Ethos and Error: How Business People React to Errors. College Composition and Communication. 53(1), 33-64. Retrieved from ProQuest.
Bowman, J. P., (2002) Writing Persuasive Messages. Retrieved on Jan 31, 2015, from https://homepages.wmich.edu/~bowman/c4eframe.html
Cialdini’s Six Principles of Influence. (n.d.). Retrieved May 05, 2016, from https://changingminds.org/techniques/general/cialdini/cialdini.htm
Conger, J. A., (1991). Inspiring Others: The Language of Leadership. The Executive, 5(1), 31-46. Retrieved from ProQuest.
Mazur, T. C., (1993). Lying. Retrieved on Jan 31, 2015, from https://scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v6n1/lying.html.
Pearson (2015c). Developing persuasive business messages. Retrieved on August 8, 2015 from https://www.pearsoncustom.com/mct-comprehensive/asset.php?isbn=1269879944&id=12404
Purdue (2015a). Online Writing Laboratory (Memos). Retrieved on Jan 31, 2015, from https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/590/01/
Purdue (2015b) Using Rhetorical Strategies for Persuasion. Retrieved on Jan 31, 2015, from https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/588/04/
Reddy, S. (2010, Nov 1). Memo to all staff: Dump your trash. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved on Feb 10, 2015, https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304316404575580534064250948
Stanford (2015). Stanford University Persuasive Technology Lab (Home). Retrieved on Jan 31, 2015, from https://captology.stanford.edu